About your Search

20120930
20121008
STATION
SFGTV2 30
SFGTV 10
CSPAN 5
CSPAN2 5
CNN 4
CNNW 4
FBC 1
KGO (ABC) 1
KICU 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
WBFF (FOX) 1
WJLA (ABC) 1
WMAR (ABC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 77
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 77 (some duplicates have been removed)
joined the uc davis school of law in 2004, following a clerkship with judge cal braise of the united states court of appeals for the second circuit. interest include election law, administrative law, statutory interpretation, constitutional law and property and natural resources law. he is a resident of san francisco's mission district. we are honored to work chris almendorf. [ applause ] >> thank you very much and thank you to all of the candidates who are here today. we're very fortunate to be joined by six candidates and what i hope will soon be seven. all of the candidates have agreed to ask their supporters to be respectful of other candidates and the audience and to maintain quiet during the forum. i ask you to respect that commitment. every aspect of this forum will be equally fair to all participating candidates. as everyone here knows candidate debates are often limited to latitudinal appears and personal attack. our debate focuses on critical areas of policy disagreement among the leading candidates. so this end the league of women voters of san francisco and the san franc
identifying ways our ethic laws could be strengthened. as supervisors, what if anything would you propose to strength the city's ethics laws. i will start with mr. davis. >> strong ethic laws are essential. what is happening with our sunshine task force and hope davis can speak to this since she recently served on the task force. these need to be strengthened and one problem we have is around enforcement. i would like to see more of the ethical violations of larger committees, some of which are operating, for instance, in some shady areas of law. one was the run he ed run, the committee for mayor ed lee last year and the campaigns that aren't swaying the politics of city, the way the run ed run campaign did. so i think that is one the issues and improving our good government and ethic laws in san francisco. >> miss breed, would you like to address the question? do you want me to repeat it? >> yes. >> sure. a recent chief civil grand jury report, at the request of supervisor campos the city conducted a comparison of laws identifying ways our ethic laws could be strengthened. as su
. >>> federal investigators are expected to arrive in vallejo this week to help investigate a fire at the law office of vallejo mayor davis. the fire was quote an act of domestic terrorism because davis is a high profile figure. the suspicious fire broke out yesterday at the building that davis shares with another building. >>> a large brawl last night in san jose left a man fatally stabbed. the fight broke out this morning. when officered arrived they found a man suffering from stab wounds he was rushed to the hospital where he died. his name has not been released. the brawl reportedly involved as many as 30 people. >>> new at 10:00 tonight, concord police say tonight's hot weather may have played a role in the death of an elderly woman who's body was found in an elementary school in pleasant hill. the 86-year-old woman who suffered from alzheimer's disease went missing from her adult health care facility in concord around 4:30. when she failed to return, they called authorities and began a search. police say high temperatures in the area might have been a factor. >>> that heat will contin
forum including the university of california-san francisco, hastings college of law, [wo-uflt/] and our media partner sfgtv. we're fortunate to have such an impressive field of candidates. i will begin with the questions. the first question is for miss breed. mr. davis, and mr. resignato. and for the benefit of the audience, i will also project the questions on the screen. please explain your position on whether or under what conditions the san francisco parks and recreation department should be parented to lease park facilitis to food vendors and other commercial enterprises? miss breed? >> hi. london breed. i think that what we see now in the recreation -- i'm sorry, what is the time limit on each of these questions? >> one minute, please. >> i think what we see now is a bit of an abuse in terms of the number of vendors that the city has leased space to in our parks. and parks and recreation is for parks and recreation and not necessarily should be a place where we are leasing space to more vendors than we particularly need in specific areas. there is a place for vendors, for foo
is the lack of enforcement of u.s. law. along the border we had two people shot yesterday. one man died. with everything from president obama on june 15, with the dream act, a few days ago governor brown decided to give drivers' licenses to illegals. i think we are creating a lot of jeopardy and risk for our people along the border. a piecet's look at about immigration and governor mitt romney, softening his stance on immigration and other issues according to usa today, trying to keep conservative appeal as he courts undecided voters. he told one denver newspaper that he would not revoke temporary visas in what appears to be his latest attempt to soften his tone on key issues. he told the post in an interview that those who qualified for deferred action programs would be permitted to stay for the allotted term. of course, candidate mitt romney, here is what the article goes on to say. his decision to take a nuanced position on the issues two weeks after he dodged a question on the issue. the last caller also mentioned the death of a border agent. here is a story on that. host: we are as
-- berkeley where he attended law school. he was, i'm sad to report, not much of a student, but he was a joiner of fraternities and maker of friends. and it was there at berkeley that he came of age just as california bulldozed its way into a new kind of politics in state history. the political movement that warren was witness to was, importantly from the his perspective, led by a trial lawyer. even as a somewhat shy young boy, warren had dreamed of practicing law in a courtroom, and as a college student he had the opportunity to watch up close one of the most arresting trial lawyers of his generation. hiram johnson, of whom i'm speaking, was a young lawyer in san francisco who was could upon to take over a corruption case against the city's mayor and some co-conspirators in a bribery scandal. he took over the case, he was second chair of the case at the outset but took over the first chair when the lead prosecutor was shot in the head in court by a dismissed juror. law students, take note. [laughter] it -- johnson made his name in that case and went on to serve as governor of cali
be a violation of the law. >> joined by our pentagon correspondent, barbara starr. you've been digging into this for new information. you say as early as april, the united states sent special forces into benghazi for a specific reason. >> they did, indeed, carol. what we've learned is that a very small team of special forces commandos were sent to that benghazi compound. this was back in april. if you think back a u.n. -- united nations convoy in the region had been attacked. growing security concerns at that time back in april, about what was going on in that region in eastern libya. so, the u.s. sent a team of about four special forces, commandos to the benghazi compound. they did a security assessment. what could be done to improve security at the facility. and they recommended apparently, we are told, a couple of things that seem fairly minor in retrospect. sand bagging some positions so libyan forces who were there, contractors, essentially, could help fight back if the place came under attack and also were training for some of that private security force that was hired for the co
at this this morning. alabama also has virtually the identical stand your ground law that florida has, so do you know that the officer ms case can probably say he was he felt that he was in danger of his life and he was standing his ground and shooting. i'm betting as this proceeds, you may see that law that we've heard so much about rear itsingly head now in alabama. >> that is really interesting to note. now, cnn, paul, spoke with the victim's mother in this case. she is, understandably, in shock. when things do settle down for her, would she have any legal recourse against the school? >> well, it's hard to say. obviously if her son was heavily intoxicated and was trying to attack a police officer, that's going to be a -- that's going to be a tough case to win. however, these campuses have alcohol problems. virtually every campus in america today has problems with intoxicated kids, and they have to develop policies to deal with it. now, this particular university, by the way, is a dry campus. you're not allowed to drink at this campus, even if you're over 21. i noticed from some local news reports
this is unacceptable. >> gretchen: they believe under federal law man dated the creation of on base voters assistance offices which they claim is not put in place. we concluded the department stands in clear violation of the federal law that man dated creation of onbase voters offices. and it will likely be paid this november by military service members and their families. you can still get the ballots and if you are a member of the military member. and family member of machine overseas they still have time to get it >> brian: if you don't get your ballot write us or maybe you are disinterested which is hard to believe with the cut backs and lay aughts and calling recruiting station that affects somebody. you are worried about your health care. 92 you have another assignment, if you have not requested an absentee ballot and why. coming up. should an illegal imbe a u.s. lawyerine though he is not a u.s. citizen. that is a big debate coming up. >> gretchen: white house offering them money so they don't send out a pink slip, is that a coincidence. stewart varney said he thought not in his british accent
as a community service, i host a radio and tv program called "folk law for ordinary folk," it's a very tough one in the sense that workers at some point are essentially giving up higher salary and higher pay in exchange for those pension benefits. so to come back later on and essentially cut that out from under them, the question is one of fairness and of equity. that being said, as far as police and firefighters, obviously those are public safety areas and it's a little bit different in the sense that we definitely need to protect those pensions in a different manner than we do others. as far as other ways to save, i would certainly look at capping pensions moving forward, so that they don't increase incrementally over time. i think we need to put a cap on that now before it starts to burgeon and get out of control. >> thank you. >> miss olague. >> i believe i was one of the individuals who answered no. i don't think we should balance the budget on the back of the workforce, and there was prop c. prop b was the adachi measure and proper c was a lot of pension reform where the unions and the
state courts could negate some of the new laws that are intended to require photo i.d.s for voters? >> the first observation is in terms of that case in maryland, that was one misguided example where it never should have happened, the race wasn't that close, so it was a huge mistake by that individual and he paid for it with time in prison. in terms of your concern about voter i.d., and having to show i.d., i live in virginia i just got my voter card. they allow anything like a utility bill or anything like that. it's a lot easier to go vote in america than get on an airplane. so if you're worried about fraud, i think these are reasonable requirements. >> i guess in terms of polling, to the extent that our firms can, we try to poll off a registered voter list so they are registered voters who presumably have -- and in elections we try to sample people who not only register but have voted in past elections. >> but this year the requirements for voting are not going to be just that you register, they're going to be that you have a voter i.d. how do you account for that? >> we ask the
correspondent mike emanuel. >> the law says mass layoffs are coming, notices should go out 60 days ahead. obama administration that isn't necessary since many are hoping a deal will be struck to avoid the cuts. even so, a ceo i talked to he will be up front with his employees. >> it makes it challenging. people come to work. we've got some of the best people in the country working for us. they come every day, they want to design the best systems that our fighters need, but it's challenging. when they sit around kitchen table at night. honey, what is going to happen? it's tough because they don't know. >> reporter: obama administration is telling contractors if they get sued for not sending out layoff notices the government will pick up the tack. lockheed martin will hold off telling workers, but two kron man sent a letter saying quote, should you rely on that guidance and fail to comply with the warren acted requirement, will you be setting up your company for serious legal and financial reprosper cushions. graham sounds pretty upset. >> in 2007, senator obama wanted to extend the notice requir
-- pill to swallow and the best way to get them to do that was to stress that this was the law. this was the rule of law and he is president was going to take care of the law. it made it much easier, and easier pill for the south to swallow. [applause] >> jonathan is great to be with you today and with all the booklovers at this fabulous festival and with a very distinguished biographer, jean edward smith way think has contributed immeasurably to the eisenhower scholarship and i have to agree he was underestimated definitely and i'm so glad that you have written such a powerful book. i think it's fascinating in reading the book to see that more of the book is focused on the military career, even though as you've just spent almost most of your time talking about the incredible eight years of of the eisenhardt registration, the estate leaned over and whispered to me i have never heard the interstate highway system applauded before. pretty exciting. first-time. >> all those people who were applauding are now going to get on 395 and be stuck in traffic or three hours. [laughter] po
set of laws is past. as quickly as they are passed election was figure out how to get around them. it's remarkably to campaign finance is a constant evolving issue. i think there's got to be mechanism, i work for to, million of politicians and my life. i believe there should be a mechanism for rank-and-file people should you be opposing some who so funny tempers a millionaire to be able to raise large amounts. i believe putting the money back have more accountability for the electorate and a much more integrity driven process an issue you're dreading to frame an election. sunday personally just. that's my from make money off these campaigns? absolutely. but from my perspective i think it's better for the country if we go back to that model. >> i don't know if i would necessary agree with that. look at what, i don't know if you saw the american crossroads add what super pacs actually to end with advertising does. a lot of people in here, remember the question in political science 101, should be elected representative do what he believes is right or what constituents because right? you
through the internet, according to a law enforcement source, both men in the connecticut case appeared in their united kingdom prison jump suits, then they were handcuffed and being led in and standard practice the handcuffs were taken off for the legal proceeding. they will also, of course, face more legal proceedings down the road. >> richard roth in new york, thanks so much. >>> now to some other very pressing domestic matters. the new jobs report, it's become a political football with the election just a month away, the labor department says 114,000 jobs were created in september with the unemployment rate coming in at 7.8% now. that's a drop of .3% from august. no spuurprise that in this seas there's different views of the same number. the chairman of economic advisers says friday's employment report provide further evidence that the u.s. economy is continuing to heal from the wounds inflicted by the worst downturn since the great depression. jack welch tweeted this, unbelievable jobs numbers, these chicago guys will do anything, can't debate so change the numbers. and the partisa
the law. um, and if you do that in this case, there is no reasonable justification for a continuation of the exclusivity ban. so i think, i think the chairman's order, um, as you describe it, um, is the appropriate course of action to take. um, you know, are -- and that's been comcast's position in the proceeding. um, life is long. as you note, our order lasts until 2018. um, and so for whatever it applies to over that period of time, it applies to. but after that period of time we should be treated like everybody else, um, and again if, um, if people believe that it is appropriate for the exclusivity ban to continue, they need to go back to congress and to get different legislation than the legislation that exists now. because the current legislation simply does not support the exclusivity ban in the current competitive positive -- posture of the marketplace. >> what happens when october 5th rolls around and it expires? do we suddenly see several exclusive contracts out there? >> guest: i don't think so. i think the fears have been overstated. i think that the marketplace now is such
and the law was added to the tax code by then senator lynn done b johnson, some historians say as to silence them. and some say the law is unconstitutional. the irs has no business make ago theological determination that certain topics are off limits if you are having church on the weekend. >> but organizations like americans united for separation of church and state. say the johnson amendment must be be upheld to protect the divide between faith and politics. >> what's at stake is the integrity of churches. churches are not supposed to be political action committees. people don't go to church for the purpose of hearing who to vote for for the city council or president, they go there for spiritual solace, they go there for personal, moral instruction to learn about their holy scriptures, not to be told who is the best president. >> this is the fifth year of freedom sunday. in the election year, the participating pastors has grown thee-fold. the goal is to get the irs law to be thrown out and the immediate goal is to have them vote their biblical values on election day. >> thank you very much
the law. and i said they were bad laws. their customs, they were tradition, and we wanted america to be better to live up to the declaration of independence, make real our democracy. when i got arrested the first time this books and i felt free. i felt liberated and today more than ever i feel free in the liberated. abraham lincoln 150 years ago freed the slaves but it took the modern-day civil rights movement to elaborate a nation. [applause] i know some of you are asking where did you get the name "across that bridge," where do to get the title from, life lessons and the vision for change? just like a few short years ago since this is an election year, hundreds and thousands and millions of people come in 11 states and the old confederacy from virginia to texas couldn't register to vote simply cause of the color of their skin. people stood in line. it took a state like the state of mississippi in 1963, 1964, 1965 more than four need to keep those in the but only about 16 those and were registered to vote. there was a county in my native state of alabama and the heart of the blac
shameful. these laws are not being enforced, have not been enforced, and the public health and the air and the water are paying the price. that's not fair for our future. i think our future requires a president to lead us in an all- out search to advance our education, our learning, and our science and training, because this world is more complex and we're being pressed harder all the time. i believe in opening doors. we won the olympics, in part, because we've had civil rights laws and the laws that prohibit discrimination against women. i have been for those efforts all my life. the president's record is quite different. the question is our future. president kennedy once said in response to similar arguments, "we are great, but we can be greater.'' we can be better if we face our future, rejoice in our strengths, face our problems, and by solving them, build a better society for our children. thank you. >> thank you, mr. mondale. [applause] please, we have not finished quite yet. thank you, mr. mondale, and thank you, mr. president. and our thanks to our panel members, as well. and s
statement to offer as well. mr. everett? >> as an attorney, i am required to uphold the laws of the state of california, and the united states as well. i'm required to do so in a completely even-handed manner. i do so with no problem and with all the love in my heart. that being said, it would be ridiculous, disingenuous and completely unhelpful not to realize that certain segments within our population here in san francisco need help more than others. it would be absolutely preposterous for me to sit up here and tell you that we're going to approach polices of economic advantagement in an even-handed manner. that would do a disservice to and again, we are a weaker city if we allow certain segments of you are population to essentially rot. we're a stronger, vibrant and more resilient city if we address the issues of those least among us, tackle them, and face them head-on. >> thank you. >> that is what i'm about. truth and honesty in our policy approached. >> mr. resignato. >> i think one important thing we need to look at is vision. really, you know? a vision for what san francisco
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 77 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)